DuBose Lectures & Alumni Gathering

Sept. 26 and 27


 

The Lectures

Can I Get a Witness?

Explorations in an Amen

1. The Aristocrats of Compassion: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Quest for a New Nobility

2. Theological Pranksters and Free-Floating Monastics: The Civil Rights Movement and Religionless Christianity

3. The Return of Splendor in the World: Resistance, Reconciliation, and Social Hope


 

About Our Lecturer

Charles Marsh is professor of religious studies and director of the Project on Lived Theology at the University of Virginia. He is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School and the University of Virginia, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1989.

Shortly after publishing Reclaiming Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Promise of His Theology (Oxford, 1994), Marsh began considering the religious and moral paradoxes of his own southern Protestant upbringing. He was struck by the complex ways theological commitments and convictions came into dramatic conflict in the civil rights movement in the American South. The religious beliefs and social practices of ordinary people of faith illuminated a new way of writing theology for him, the first fruit being God’s Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights (Princeton, 1997) which won the 1998 Grawemeyer Award in Religion.

His memoir, The Last Days: A Son’s Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South (Basic Books, 2001), is a coming of age account of a minister’s son in a small Mississippi town that was home to the Christian terrorist organization called the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

His 2005 book, The Beloved Community: How Faith Shapes Social Justice, from the Civil Rights Movement to Today (Basic Books), developed a new interpretation of the Civil Rights Movement based on Martin Luther King Jr.’s remark that “the end [of the movement] is not the protest, the end is not the boycott; the end is redemption, reconciliation and the creation of beloved community.”

In 2007, Marsh wrote a theological analysis of the Christian Right’s support of the presidency of George W. Bush entitled Wayward Christian Soldiers: Freeing the Gospel from Political Captivity (Oxford, June 2007), which was excerpted in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune and the Boston Globe.

Marsh is delighted to have co-authored a book with his lifelong friend, the civil rights activist John M. Perkins. Welcoming Justice: God’s Movement Toward Beloved Community was published by InterVarsity Press in fall 2009 and is based on lectures delivered during the Teaching Communities Conference at the Duke Divinity School Center for Reconciliation.

Marsh, a 2009 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in the Creative Arts, served as the Ellen Maria Gorrissen Fellow at the American Academy of Berlin in spring 2010. His most recent book, Strange Glory: A Life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Knopf, 2014), received the 2015 Christianity Today Book Award in History/Biography


 

Lodging

There are 15 rooms being held in a block for our DuBose attendees to reserve. Rooms may be booked using this link.

You may also call Sewanee Inn at 855.494.4466 and give the Booking Code: DUBOSE918.


DuBose Awards

The DuBose Awards, at one time known as the Faithful Alum Award and the DuBose Award for Service, have been restructured to broaden the award categories and invite nominations from across the Church. The awards celebrate the ministries of both laypersons and clergy. Nominations are received from October to end of May the following year and the recipient(s) will be announced during the annual DuBose Alumni Gathering banquet. You may submit a nomination using this form.

Qualifications

In order to submit a nomination, the nominee must either be:

Award Categories

Note: One award per category will be given per year.

The DuBose Award Committee will review submissions and choose awardees. Awardee(s) will be notified in August.

Questions may be directed to Sukey Byerly, by email or phone, 931.598.1217.


Registration

You may register online using this form.

Shuttles will be provided to and from the School of Theology and Sewanee Inn to central campus, and to and from Sewanee Inn and Cravens Hall for the alumni reception and dinner on Wednesday, September 26.

If you have any mobility issues and will require special assistance, please call 931.598.1105.


Schedule (subject to slight modifications)

Tuesday, Sept. 25

1 p.m.–5 p.m.     Check-in     Convocation Hall

1 p.m. – 5 p.m.     Campaign Hospitality Station     Convocation Hall

5:10 p.m.     Evensong     Choir of All Saints’ Chapel

Evening     Dinner on your own                                                                                                  

 

Wednesday, Sept. 26

8:05 a.m.     Morning Prayer     Choir of All Saints’ Chapel

8:30 a.m.     University Art Gallery open     Between Convocation and Guerry              

8:30 a.m.     Check-in continues     Convocation Hall

8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.     Campaign Hospitality Station     Convocation Hall

8:30 a.m.–4 p.m.     School of Theology merchandise sales     Convocation Hall

8:30 a.m.–4 p.m.     University Bookstore selling books     Convocation Hall             

9 a.m.–10:30 a.m.     Lecture 1, Charles Marsh     Guerry Auditorium

11 a.m.     Alumni Memorial Eucharist     All Saints’ Chapel

12:45 p.m.     Lunch     McClurg Dining Hall

2 p.m.–3:30 p.m.     Lecture 2, Charles Marsh     Guerry Auditorium

3:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.     Book signing     Convocation Hall

6 p.m.     Reception     Lower Cravens

6:45 p.m.     Dinner and Program     Upper Cravens

8:30 p.m.–midnight     Dancing (Number One Party Band)     Upper Cravens

 

Thursday, Sept. 27

8 a.m.     University Art Gallery open     Between Convocation and Guerry              

8 a.m.–9 a.m.     Continental breakfast     Convocation Hall

8:10 a.m.     Morning Prayer     Choir of All Saints’ Chapel

8:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.     Campaign Hospitality Station     Convocation Hall

8:30 a.m.–11 a.m.     School of Theology merchandise sales     Convocation Hall

9 a.m.–10:30 a.m.     Lecture 3, Charles Marsh     Guerry Auditorium