University Wellness Center Monthly Newsletter

Missed our monthly email?  Our newsletters are always posted here on our site for your reference!  Please use the links below to find our previous letters.

November 2018 Newsletter

The University Wellness Center
November Newsletter


Welcome to the third issue of the University Wellness Center Newsletter!

Who Are We? The University Wellness Center at the University of the South is a campus resource which offers integrated and holistic health care, comprehensive wellness outreach, and peer health education for students. The University Wellness Center is composed of Counseling and Psychological Services, Student Accessibility Services, University Health Service, and Wellness Outreach.

What to Expect? New issues will be published on the first Tuesday of every month, all of which we hope will keep you updated on our latest news and provide you with information about upcoming trainings, events and programming!

Each month's issue will focus on a new topic and include a description, spotlight post, and monthly challenge based on that theme. The topic for November is sleep!
 

 


Superhero meme

November Topic: Sleep

As the semester moves into the winter months, it becomes more important for us to make getting healthy and restful sleep a priority. This is difficult as the early nights and near constant state of Sewanee fog can inhibit our natural sleep and wake cycles. Plus, as children, going to sleep was likely the only part of our day when we would be alone and without some type of stimulation. As a child this can be a scary time; filled with darkness, strange noises, overactive imaginations, and loneliness. Later this can turn into boredom or anxiety or both—often worsened by the stress of daily life, so we pick up habits to deal with these uncomfortable feelings. We eat snacks, we watch TV, or mindlessly scroll through social media, or we stay up to the point of passing out just to avoid the discomfort of trying to go to sleep.

Despite these attempts to cope, sleep is important for many reasons. It is during sleep that the brain literally cleans itself, allowing for the flow of cerebral fluid to go in and wash away the protein byproduct left behind by our hard working brain cells (this is the same protein that causes fogginess, cognitive delay, and confusion without sleep). The brain also uses sleep to organize its self and makes the information you’ve added to it accessible so it can be used later on. So, it turns out that all-nighter you were planning to study for that test may actually be working against you. Multiple studies have found that students tend to perform better on tests and quizzes with little to no studying and a good night’s sleep versus students with lots of studying and little to no sleep. So, you want to good on that exam tomorrow? Go to sleep.

 

 

November Spotlight: 10 Steps to Better Sleep (And 10 Easier Steps if Those are Too Hard)

Benjamin Craft, MS, LPC-MHSP, Case Manager, University Wellness Center

The goal of this list is to engage in an empathetic understanding of the habits we tend to utilize at bedtime by recognizing them as coping strategies—even if they are not the healthiest or most effective. After all, it is rare that anyone’s coping strategies are 100% healthy or effective (I mean—have you walked around on campus on the weekend??).

With that in mind, I will note the absolute best practices for better and healthier sleep, discuss why these options can be difficult, then give smaller more achievable sleep goals that, while maybe not strictly “best practices,” can still lead to more restful and fulfilling sleep.

  1. Create a bedtime routine.

A regular bedtime routine allows our bodies and our brains to begin the transition that will allow you to fall asleep. Successful bedtime routines include equal parts physical personal hygiene and comfort inducing stimuli. Brush teeth, take a shower, change into pajamas, etc.

Can’t do it?

Then simply do one or two things—as opposed to a full blown routine. It will still have a positive effect on your brain and still have some sleep benefit if all you can manage is brushing your teeth and changing into pajamas.

  1. Manage and “comfortize” your sleep space.

Make sure your bed and your room is as comfortable and inviting as possible based on your individual preferences. You want to do all you can to increase comfort in all 5 senses.

Easier said than done?

Make one single change that will add to your comfort, no matter how small or insignificant it may feel.

  1. Do not use mind-altering substances.

Mind-altering substances can drastically reduce healthy and restful sleep. This is obvious for some substances such as stimulants like Adderall, cocaine, or MDMA, it turns out even more benign and socially acceptable substances like alcohol and cannabis can have similar negative effect son sleep.

“Really? This is college.”

Stimulants should be avoided, or at least taken early enough that they do not interfere with bedtime. Stop using substances an hour or two before you plan to go to bed and hydrating might allow your brain to get closer to its sleep-ready chemical balance.

  1. Do not drink caffeine.

Caffeine works by blocking the chemicals that the brain needs for sleep, essentially stopping the brain from being able to being the sleep inducing process.

“Uhh how am I supposed to function without my double-shot espresso?”

Eliminate caffeine in the afternoons and evenings. Even if you need your coffee or your energy drink in the morning, once noon hits lay off coffee and sodas and caffeinated teas and stick to water, juice, and non-caffeinated sodas.

  1. Engage in brief stress reduction techniques.

Can’t stop thinking about that minor screw up from earlier? Or maybe your brain continuously reminds you of everything you have to do the following day. Try Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) or mindfulness meditations found here: PMR, Mindfulness Meditation.

“I barely have time to exist—now you want me to meditate?”

No time? Then try this: take something you already know all the words to, such as a nursery rhyme or the Pledge of Allegiance, and you recite, quietly or out loud, each word seven times (i.e. “I, I, I, I, I, I, I pledge, pledge, pledge, pledge, pledge, pledge, pledge, pledge, allegiance, allegiance . . . etc.) Some of my patients have reported being asleep before they finish.

  1. Bed is for sleep and intimacy. Nothing else!

Stop using your bed for other activities like homework in effort to train your brain and body to see your bed as the place for sleep and personal or partnered intimacy, and that is it. This is working to provide a physical sign to your brain and body that it is time for sleep.

“My bed is like the only furniture I really have . . .”

You can still work to do as few things as possible in your bed besides sleep and intimacy. The next time you catch yourself doing homework or watching Netflix in your bed, move to a chair or sitting on the floor.

  1. Eat healthy meals regularly and drink plenty of water.

When we don’t get enough food and water, our stomachs send a signal to our brain the releases norepinephrine, which stresses you and, you guessed it, keeps you from sleeping.

“I barely have time to get to class some days, much less constantly go to McClurg.”

Cary a water bottle with you to remind you to hydrate, and keep healthy snacks like granola bars with you so you can eat on the run.

  1. Maintain a consistent sleep schedule (there’s no making it up).

The truth is there is no such thing as “catching up” on sleep. The reality is any sleep lost is just that: lost. And sadly, there is no getting it back. So the best practice is to maintain a consistent sleep schedule all 7 days of the week.

“But that sounds really hard . . .”

It is, but any step in the right direction will help. Do you usually sleep in till noonon Saturday? Just try waking up at 10:30 or 11 AM instead. Every little bit helps!

  1. No screen time an hour before bed.

The science is clear: reduce your screen time as much as possible during the day, and have all screens turned off or put away an hour before your plan to go to sleep.

“Yeah . . . no . . . I need to watch something when I go sleep.”

I get it. At the very least turn off the blue light I your screen so your brain knows it’s dark out, and try to reduce the amount of screen time at bedtime—watch one episode instead of two.

  1. Physical activity.

Developing a consistent exercise routine, preferable one that involves some cardio, will almost always result in better sleep.

So, I don’t know if you’ve heard but finding time as a Sewanee student is hard.”

Very true, but you do not need a full blown workout routine. Take a five minute walk outside a couple of times a week. It will still help with sleep even if it feels easy.

Do your best with these steps, but remember even if the steps themselves feel unachievable; there is almost always at least some small steps that can still be beneficial. You don’t have to shoot for the moon, any of the small steps outlined above, even if they feel slight or like they aren’t enough, will help at least some. You are worth the time and the effort, I promise.

Author’s note: This is an abridged version of a much longer original article. If you would like to read the full article (I highly suggest it), just click the following: Healthy Sleep from the November Wellness Newsletter.

November Challenge: 

 
Make it your goal to achieve at least 3 of these steps within the next two weeks. With the recent time change and the increase in winter weather, it is more important than ever that we work to make sleep a priority. Pick three steps that feel doable and possible with your current daily routine, and make them happen.

Share your progress on the challenge of the month by tagging #SewaneeFlourish

 

Calendar & Upcoming


Wellness Colloquium: Life After Fundamentalism: Finding Faith as a Queer
Wednesday, November, 14, 2018
12:00pm (Lunch provided)
Mary Sue Cushman Room

Family Dinner
Wednesday, November, 7, 2018
7:00pm
Italian House 
Contact Sabeth Jackson to sign-up

Active Minds & Healthy Hut Present: "It's Real" Movie Screening
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
7:00pm
Social Lodge

Group Therapy Schedule:
  • Monday 3:00pm: Therapy Group
  • Tuesday 3:00pm: Interpersonal Therapy Group I
Email caps@sewanee.edu if interested . All group therapy sessions are held in the University Wellness Center Annex and facilitated by John Jackson, Ben Craft and/or Katie Van Cleave. 

Wellness & Outreach.

Sabeth Jackson, Wellness Coordinator.

October was a busy month! Here’s a snapshot of what took place:

  • Active Minds: We had our first chapter meeting 10/12, and have recruited 5 new members.
  • Family Dinner: We had a great time at the Q&A house on 10/10. We made wontons, sesame noodles, and an apple crumble. Honorary student Elsie Jackson (aged 14 months) was also in attendance!
  • Wellness Colloquium & Workshop: Nature and Forest Therapy guided walk with Connie Keetle on 10/13, Disability Awareness Workshop with Donald Norman on Oct. 31.

Here’s a look at what we have planned for November:

  • Weekly Yoga: We’ll try switching up our classes this month.
    • Vinyasa Yoga, Thursdays, 4-5 pm, UWC Annex
    • Yin Yoga, Fridays, 8-9 am, UWC Annex
  • Family DinnerWednesday, November 7, Italian House, 7pm
    • Dining Services and The UWC have teamed up to offer Family Dinner. We will have a different theme/Greek house host each month, and 12-15 students can sign up. We will provide the tools, ingredients, and techniques for the group to make a simple meal together, and then we will enjoy the fruits of our labor!
  •  Wellness Colloquium
    • "Life After Fundamentalism: Finding Faith as a Queer Person": Talk by Meredith Garrett, Nov. 14, noon, Mary Sue Cushman room at the WICK, lunch provided.
  • Peer Health Education
    • PHE is open to all Sewanee students and requires a 2 semester commitment. PHE's receive training that empowers them to serve their peers on a variety of health related issues. PHE’s design and deliver educational programming, and partner with groups on campus to tailor programs to their needs. Contact ssjackso@sewanee.edu to apply.
  • Active Minds
    • Active Minds is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising mental health awareness among college students, on the peer level. Meetings are Fridays at 4:15 at Stirling’s.  Contact ssjackso@sewanee.edu with questions.
 

SAMHSA Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant

Julian Wright, Grant & Research Administrator.

Equity in Mental Health Framework
In the October UWC Newsletter, we announced that Sewanee has recently joined the Jed Foundation as a Jed Campus. As a part of this membership, Sewanee has also been selected as one of 16 universities across the nation to participate in the Jed Foundation & Steve Fund pilot of the Equity in Mental Health Framework (EMHF). The EMHF provides a model that can guide colleges and universities in developing, implementing, and refining on-campus programs to support the emotional well-being and mental health of students of color. The pilot will take place over the next 2 years. 

The primary aim of the pilot study is to conduct a needs assessment to provide data on current mental health challenges facing students of color and on the availability of current campus services. The initial assessment will be completed by conducting focus groups to gather feedback on what students and administrators feel are the mental health needs of students of color and to give feedback on ways to improve the well-being of students of color; a detailed understanding of programs that have already been implemented, and feedback on how to improve implementation or address any issues that have arisen. 

We will hold two separate focus groups, one for students and one for administrators in early December (exact date and time TBD). We are recruiting 20 students and 20 administrators to participate. The recruitment procedure for the pilot, directed by the Steve Fund, stipulates that at least 75% of the student focus group must be comprised of students of color.

Please email Julian Wright (jwwright@sewanee.edu) if you are a student, faculty, staff, or administrator who is informed about the current campus climate and interested in participating in a focus groups. We appreciate your contribution and feedback.

The University of the South is able to become a Jed Campus Partner and participate in the EMHF Pilot thanks to funding from the SAMHSA GLS Grant. 

Health Services.

Karen Tharp, Director, University Health Service. 
  • UHS Nurse Practitioners will both be attending contraception conferences this month.  Mindy Holloway will attend Contemporary Forums' Contraceptive Technologies conference in Atlanta, GA.  This conference has been invaluable to UHS clinicians in keeping up to date on the latest in contraceptive management.  Tonia Christian will be attending the A Step Ahead conference in Chattanooga, TN.  This conference provides training and strengthens our partnership with A Step Ahead in Chattanooga.  A Step Ahead provides funding for UHS to make long-acting reversible contraception available free of charge to Sewanee students.https://www.astepaheadchattanooga.org/
  • UHS has flu shots available for students!! Call and book a nurse appointment ASAP(x1270). Protect yourself, your family, and your community. Come and get vaccinated BEFORE we start seeing influenza on campus and prior to traveling for Thanksgiving break.  Check out the NPR segment below that highlights college student behavior around getting the vaccine:
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/10/01/652140517/think-you-dont-need-a-flu-shot-here-are-5-reasons-to-change-your-mind

Counseling and Psychological Services.

John Jackson, Ph.D., Director, Counseling and Psychological Services.

Autumn greetings from your therapists and friends at Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)!

In this newsletter, I’d like to focus on our group therapy offerings at CAPS. Students are often unaware or skeptical of group therapy, and that’s a shame.  Research clearly demonstrates that group therapy is an effective form of psychotherapy and that it is at least equal to individual therapy in its power to provide significant benefits. I often hear students worry that a group will be unable or unwilling to uphold confidentiality. In fact, all group members agree to and uphold stringent boundaries to honor confidentiality.  Members come to care for one another, and they take confidentiality seriously. I also hear students worry that they will receive less time to address their concerns in a group relative to individual therapy. To the contrary, group members often find themselves with more time to speak as the group continues throughout a semester. In addition, members receive feedback and support from their peer group members as well as from the trained group therapist. At times, it’s as if a member has the attention and care of several helpers. Finally, I hear some concerns from students regarding the group setting as a poor fit for addressing certain symptoms or issues. It is true that certain symptoms are a better fit for individual than group therapy, but these instances are by far the exception rather than the norm.  Being a member of a group is a deeply meaningful experience that facilitates not only symptom relief but also personal growth and positive personality change. So, if you are considering therapy, consider joining a group. Let someone on our staff know that you are interested in group, and we’ll talk with you about various options. It’s likely to be one of the best decisions you make this year.    
 
Training Opportunities
Please see the Calendar and Updates for upcoming training dates.

Bystander Intervention Training
This prevention program emphasizes a bystander intervention approach and assumes that everyone has a role to play in ending violence against women. In addition to the prevention goal, the program has a research component which seeks to measure the effective of the prevention program with different constituencies. Participation in this program and research project represents a unique opportunity to take on a leadership role in educating themselves on how to stop violence on campus. 

RESPOND Training
Respond stands for 1) Recognize signs & symptoms 2) Empathize 3) Share observations 4) Pose open questions 5) Offer hope 6) Navigate resources & policies 7) Do self-care. RESPOND is an eight-hour program designed to train higher education professionals as gatekeepers to identify symptoms of mental illness and to offer effective support to students in distress.

QPR Training
QPR stands for Question, Persuade, Refer. QPR is a two-hour evidence-based practice model for training gatekeepers and the general public on how to prevent suicide. QPR is an approach to confronting someone about their possible thoughts of suicide. It is not intended to be a form of counseling or treatment, instead a means to offer hope through positive action. 

Full Embodiment: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED)
Fully Embodied: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED) is a peer-facilitated experiential workshop designed to help participants explore their relationship to their body with the goals of understanding the effects of (1) gender socialization (2) objectification and self-objectification and (3) cultural forces rooted in patriarchy that influence how one views and experiences one’s body. By gaining knowledge of social and cultural pressures, and the mechanisms by which they retain power, participants are taught new ways of being in relationship with their bodies. Participants complete the program committed to working toward instrumentality and embodiment, experiencing a new engagement with their physical self that recognizes the power of the body to provide meaning and agency in one’s life. Practical skill development includes learning mindfulness, self-compassion, and cognitive reframing skills. 

The program was developed by Dr. Noffsinger-Frazier and is implemented annually with the assistance of two FEED co-leaders. This year's leaders are Ashlin Ondrusek and Loring McDonald.


Resources

The University Wellness Center
Offers appointments Monday-Friday8:00am - 12:00pm and 1:00 - 4:30pm. Walk-in crisis services are available during this time.

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) caps@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1325 
  • Assessment and evaluation
  • Short-term group therapy
  • Short-term individual therapy
  • Psychiatric services (medication management)
  • Crisis services
  • Community referral coordination
Student Accessibility Services (SAS) sas@sewaneee.edu or 931-598-1325
  • Ensure all university programs and services are accessible to students with disabilities
  • Ensure that the university is in compliance with disability law
  • Grant accommodation requests for students with documented disabilities

University Health Service (UHS) healthservice@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1270
  • Evaluation and treatment of illness and injuries
  • Health education and information
  • Physical exams
  • Sexual health services
  • Emergency contraception
  • Limited prescription medication dispensary
  • Immunizations
  • Diagnostic laboratory testing
  • Referral to specialty providers
Crisis Resources
  • UWC, After-Hours Crisis Services 931-598-1700
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) 
  • Trevor Lifeline (support for LGBTQIAA youth) 1-866-488-7386
  • Crisis Text Line Text START to 741741

October 2018 Newsletter

The University Wellness Center
October Newsletter


Welcome to the second issue of the University Wellness Center Newsletter!

Who Are We? The University Wellness Center at the University of the South is a campus resource which offers integrated and holistic health care, comprehensive wellness outreach, and peer health education for students. The University Wellness Center is composed of Counseling and Psychological Services, Student Accessibility Services, University Health Service, and Wellness Outreach.

What to Expect? New issues will be published on the first Tuesday of every month, all of which we hope will keep you updated on our latest news and provide you with information about upcoming trainings, events and programming!

Each month's issue will focus on a new topic and include a description, spotlight post, and monthly challenge based on that theme. The topic for October is National Disability Awareness Month. 
 

 

October Topic: National Disability Awareness Month.

We are all “temporarily-abled". At some point, almost everyone will develop a disability. Per the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a disability is defined as a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Many disabilities, including learning disabilities, health conditions such as diabetes, and psychological disabilities, are invisible.

Nearly 20 percent of United States citizens have some limitation due to a disability. That is roughly 40 million people. More than 7 million of us use devices to compensate for mobility impairments. Among working-age people with disabilities who do not work, 40% live in poverty. Among working age people, people with disabilities earn significantly less than non-disabled people.

People with disabilities are four to ten times more likely to be assaulted, robbed, or sexually attacked than people who are not disabled. One recent study found that more than 70 percent of women with developmental disabilities are sexually assaulted in their lifetimes, which represents a 50 percent higher rate than the rest of the population.

Why Should You Celebrate Disability Awareness Month?

  • To learn about an important group that is struggling for full inclusion in US society.
  • To understand why laws were created to protect people with disabilities, and how they work.
  • To help improve attitudes and eliminate stereotypes that hold back people with disabilities.
  • To learn to separate people from their disabilities, so accomplishments are recognized without an inappropriate focus on disability.
  • To recognize that we are all just a heartbeat away from becoming disabled through illness or accidents.
 

 

 

October Spotlight: Why is Disability Awareness so important?

Donald J. Norman, Director of Accessibility Services, University Wellness Center

Why is disability awareness so important? Actually, it’s quite simple. Disability Awareness is important because the biggest barrier to people with disabilities are people without disabilities. Disability Awareness means educating people regarding disabilities and giving people the knowledge required to carry out a job or task thus separating good practice from poor. It is no longer enough just to know that disability discrimination is unlawful.

If you’re reading this, we have a shared responsibility to ensure that The University of the South is accessible to all people regardless of disability status. Unfortunately, there is a preconception in our society regarding disability. Sometimes there is avoidance, fear or discomfort that surrounds it. Therefore, many issues surrounding this topic remain unresolved because our exposure to the issues are minimal.

How can we as an institution welcome all students, faculty, and staff? The following suggestions are far from exhaustive, but they are a start:

  1. Ensure events or meetings are held in accessible locations. The law requires higher education programs to be physically accessible. However, there are many times when meetings and events are held  in inaccessible locations even when there are alternatives. Please be mindful of students, faculty, staff members or parents with mobility, hearing, or visual impairments when scheduling events.
  2. Consider that much of a student’s college experience takes place outside of the classroom. Students learn during performances, from guest speakers, and at campus/club-sponsored community events. Acknowledging that students with disabilities deserve the range of learning opportunities available to their nondisabled peers might mean captioning important performances, lectures, and ceremonies and scheduling off-campus events in wheelchair-accessible locations (where appropriate transportation is available).
  3. Offer comprehensive training to faculty. Many faculty members work hard to accommodate students, but others do not know what they are required to do or how to do it. Still others remain uneducated about how accommodating diverse needs might enhance their pedagogy. More and better training from Student Accessibility Services would help.
 
 

October Challenge: Advice for interacting with the differently abled


This month, we encourage you to be mindful about how you interact with those who are differently abled:

Don’t make assumptions about people or their disabilities.
Don’t assume you know what someone wants, what he feels, or what is best for him. If you have a question about what to do, how to do it, what language or terminology to use, or what assistance to offer, ask him/her.

Talk directly to the user of an interpreter, not to the interpreter, attendant, or friend.
You don’t need to ignore the others entirely; just make sure to focus your interaction with the user. When a user who is deaf has an interpreter, the user will look at the interpreter as you are talking. It might take a little extra effort to remember to face the user rather than the interpreter.

Speak normally.
Some people have a tendency to talk louder and slower to people with disabilities; don’t. Don’t assume that because a person has one disability, that he also has a cognitive disability or is hard of hearing.

Use “people-first” language when referring to people with disabilities.
People-first language means put the person first and the disability second. For example, say “a man who is blind” rather than “a blind man,” and “a woman who uses a wheelchair” instead of “a wheelchair-bound woman.

Share your progress on the challenge of the month by tagging #SewaneeFlourish
 

Calendar & Upcoming


Deaf Education Workshop
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
10:00am-12:00pm
Mary Sue Cushman Room

Taste of Disability Faculty Luncheon
Wednesday, October 17, 2018
11:30am-1:00pm
McClurg 2nd Floor meeting room

DisAbility Awareness Movie: What's Eating Gilbert Grape?
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
7:30pm
Sewanee Union Theatre

Wellness Colloquium: DisAbility Awareness Workshop
Monday, October 29, 2018
12:00pm-1:00pm
Mary Sue Cushman Room

Family Dinner
Wednesday, October 10, 2018
7:00pm
Q&A House

Nature & Forest Therapy Guided Walks Info Session with Connie Keetle
Monday, October 8, 2018
12:00pm-1:00pm
Mary Sue Cushman Room

Wellness Workshop: Nature & Forest Therapy Guided Walks with Connie Keetle
Saturday, October 13, 2018
9:00am-11:00am
Abbos Alley 
Contact ssjackso@sewanee.edu to sign up (15 slots available) 

Group Therapy Schedule:
  • Monday 3:00pm: Mindfulness (open to all first year students)
  • Tuesday 3:00pm: Interpersonal Therapy Group I
  • Wednesday 9:00am: Mindfulness (open to all students)
  • Thursday 9:00am: Interpersonal Therapy Group II
Email caps@sewanee.edu if interested . All group therapy sessions are held in the University Wellness Center Annex and facilitated by John Jackson, Ben Craft and/or Katie Van Cleave. 
 
 

 

SAMHSA Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant

Julian Wright, Grant & Research Administrator.

Exciting news - The University of the South has joined the Jed Campus program in support of student well-being and mental health.

About The Jed Foundation:
Jed is a non-profit organization working to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among college and university students. The objectives of Jed are to 1) Promote awareness and understanding that emotional well-being is achievable, 2) mental illness is treatable, and 3) suicide is preventable.

About Jed Campus:
Jed Campus is an initiative of Jed designed to guide schools through a collaborative process of comprehensive systems, program and policy development with customized support to build upon existing student mental health, substance abuse and suicide prevention efforts. Jed Campuses embark on a four-year strategic partnership with Jed that not only assesses and enhances the work that is already being done, but helps to create positive, systemic change in the campus community.

About our Jed Campus Team:
Emotional health is a campus-wide issue that impacts and involves multiple campus departments and stakeholders. The Jed Campus Team is an interdisciplinary team working on campus-wide strategies for promoting emotional health and preventing substance abuse and suicide. This team is comprised of strong leadership from all levels of the institution and is working diligently to improve student well-being at Sewanee. A big thank you to our Jed Campus Team for their continued good work and support in this process.

The University of the South is able to become a Jed Campus Partner thanks to funding from the SAMHSA GLS Grant. 

 

Health Services.

Karen Tharp, Director, University Health Service. 

Greetings from UHS! Our bodies all react to seasonal changes as the days shorten and the weather gets colder. Here are some quick tips for taking care of yourself as we move into colder and shorter days:

  • Get outside. Natural light boosts your Vitamin D which will help you feel more energetic and focused. Natural light also elevates your mood.
  • Get some exercise at least every other day. Exercise is a natural antidepressant as it increases your “feel good” hormones. Take a walk with a friend and talk through your day.  This is a great way to get to know someone better, get your exercise, and get outside.
  • Pay attention to getting the nutrients you need. Vegetables and fruits of many colors give you the vitamins you need while lean meats, fish, legumes, nuts, eggs and other forms of protein help your body and mind stay well.
  • Be protective of and proactive about sleep. You need good, uninterrupted sleep to function at an optimal level. Pay attention to your inner voice when it tells you to take a break from a late night out or making another commitment. Napping during the day can be really helpful. A short nap boosts your energy and focus.
  • Wash your hands. Hand washing is proven to be the single best way to reduce transmission of illness. So wash your hands if you've been around others who are sick as well as when you leave public spaces like McClurg or Fowler.
  • Speaking of illness, don’t share your beverages. This is a no brainer. Obviously, this is an easy way to contract a viral or bacterial infection and for it to spread rapidly.
  • Get your flu shot. Sewanee is a small community in which flu spreads rapidly. Remember, protecting yourself with a flu shot also protects those most vulnerable to illness on campus. For more information about preventing influenza infection click here: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/prevention.htm  We will send out campus wide emails and messages from our FB page when the vaccines are available https://www.facebook.com/sewaneeuniversityhealthservice/.  UHS should have them very soon.
 

Wellness & Outreach.

Sabeth Jackson, Wellness Coordinator.

The semester started off with some great wellness and outreach programs, including Family Dinner at the Healthy Hut, Yoga at the Annex, the Flourishing Fair, the creation of a new Active Minds chapter, and our first Wellness Colloquium of the year. 
 
Here’s a look at what we have planned for October!
 
Weekly: 
Yin Yoga, Thursdays, 4-5 pm, UWC Annex
Vinyasa Yoga, Fridays, 8-9 am, UWC Annex
 
This Month:
Family Dinner:
Wednesday, October 10, Q&A House, 7pm 
Dining Services and The UWC have teamed up to offer Family Dinner. We will have a different theme/Greek house host each month, and 12-15 students can sign up. We will provide the tools, ingredients, and techniques for the group to make a simple meal together, and then we will enjoy the fruits of our labor! 
 
Wellness Colloquium:
Monday, October 8, 2018 12:00pm-1:00pm
Nature and Forest Therapy Guided Walks Info Session with Connie Keetle in the Mary Sue Cushman room at the WICK, snacks provided.
 
Wellness Workshop:
Saturday, October 13 from 9:00am-11:00am
Nature & Forest Therapy Guided Walk with Connie Keetle in Abbos Alley. Free, 15 spots available, contact Sabeth Jackson ssjackso@sewanee.edu to sign up. 
 
Peer Health Education:
PHE is open to all Sewanee students and requires a 2 semester commitment. PHE's receive training that empowers them to serve their peers on a variety of health related issues. PHE’s design and deliver educational programming, and partner with groups on campus to tailor programs to their needs. Contact ssjackso@sewanee.eduto apply.
 
Active Minds:
Active Minds is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising mental health awareness among college students, on the peer level. We are looking for members! Contact ssjackso@sewanee.edu
 
 
Training Opportunities
Please see the Calendar and Updates for upcoming training dates.

Bystander Intervention Training
This prevention program emphasizes a bystander intervention approach and assumes that everyone has a role to play in ending violence against women. In addition to the prevention goal, the program has a research component which seeks to measure the effective of the prevention program with different constituencies. Participation in this program and research project represents a unique opportunity to take on a leadership role in educating themselves on how to stop violence on campus. 

RESPOND Training
Respond stands for 1) Recognize signs & symptoms 2) Empathize 3) Share observations 4) Pose open questions 5) Offer hope 6) Navigate resources & policies 7) Do self-care. RESPOND is an eight-hour program designed to train higher education professionals as gatekeepers to identify symptoms of mental illness and to offer effective support to students in distress.

QPR Training
QPR stands for Question, Persuade, Refer. QPR is a two-hour evidence-based practice model for training gatekeepers and the general public on how to prevent suicide. QPR is an approach to confronting someone about their possible thoughts of suicide. It is not intended to be a form of counseling or treatment, instead a means to offer hope through positive action. 

Full Embodiment: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED)
Fully Embodied: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED) is a peer-facilitated experiential workshop designed to help participants explore their relationship to their body with the goals of understanding the effects of (1) gender socialization (2) objectification and self-objectification and (3) cultural forces rooted in patriarchy that influence how one views and experiences one’s body. By gaining knowledge of social and cultural pressures, and the mechanisms by which they retain power, participants are taught new ways of being in relationship with their bodies. Participants complete the program committed to working toward instrumentality and embodiment, experiencing a new engagement with their physical self that recognizes the power of the body to provide meaning and agency in one’s life. Practical skill development includes learning mindfulness, self-compassion, and cognitive reframing skills. 

The program was developed by Dr. Noffsinger-Frazier and is implemented annually with the assistance of two FEED co-leaders. This year's leaders are Ashlin Ondrusek and Loring McDonald.

Resources

The University Wellness Center
Offers appointments Monday-Friday, 8:00am - 12:00pm and 1:00 - 4:30pm. Walk-in crisis services are available during this time.

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) caps@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1325
  • Assessment and evaluation
  • Short-term group therapy
  • Short-term individual therapy
  • Psychiatric services (medication management)
  • Crisis services
  • Community referral coordination
Student Accessibility Services (SAS) sas@sewaneee.edu or 931-598-1325
  • Ensure all university programs and services are accessible to students with disabilities
  • Ensure that the university is in compliance with disability law
  • Grant accommodation requests for students with documented disabilities

University Health Service (UHS) healthservice@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1270
  • Evaluation and treatment of illness and injuries
  • Health education and information
  • Physical exams
  • Sexual health services
  • Emergency contraception
  • Limited prescription medication dispensary
  • Immunizations
  • Diagnostic laboratory testing
  • Referral to specialty providers
Crisis Resources
  • UWC, After-Hours Crisis Services 931-598-1700
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) 
  • Trevor Lifeline (support for LGBTQIAA youth) 1-866-488-7386
  • Crisis Text Line Text START to 741741

September 2018 Newsletter

The University Wellness Center
September Newsletter


Welcome to the first issue of the University Wellness Center Newsletter!

Who Are We? The University Wellness Center at the University of the South is a campus resource which offers integrated and holistic health care, comprehensive wellness outreach, and peer health education for students. The University Wellness Center is composed of Counseling and Psychological Services, Student Accessibility Services, University Health Service, and Wellness Outreach.

What to Expect? New issues will be published on the first Monday of every month, all of which we hope will keep you updated on our latest news and provide you with information about upcoming trainings, events and programming!

Each month's issue will focus on a new topic and include a description, spotlight post, and monthly challenge based on that theme. The topic for September is Suicide Prevention and Flourishing. 

We've got a lot going on this month including Goat Yoga and the Flourishing Fair, a "Woebot," new group therapy offerings, flu shots, and so much more, so keep reading!
 
Suicide Prevention

September Topic: National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month


We can all help prevent suicide. Every year, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and other mental health organizations and individuals across the U.S. and around the world raise awareness of suicide prevention during September, National Suicide Prevention Month.

National Suicide Prevention Month. All month, mental health advocates, prevention organizations, survivors, allies, and community members unite to promote suicide prevention awareness.

National Suicide Prevention Week is the Monday through Sundaysurrounding World Suicide Prevention Day. It’s a time to share resources and stories, as well as promote suicide prevention awareness.

World Suicide Prevention Day is September 10. It’s a time to remember those affected by suicide, to raise awareness, and to focus efforts on directing treatment to those who need it most. The University Wellness Center will be hosting a Flourishing Fair on this day to bring together students, campus partners, and community organizations to promote overall mental health and well-being (keep reading for more details). 

Preventing Suicide 
College can be tough! There are so many things to balance, and sometimes the stress of college can become overwhelming. Keep an eye out for your friends, and get them connected before things get worse. The following signs may mean someone is at risk for suicide:
  • Talking about feeling hopeless
  • Talking about feeling trapped 
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Talking about wanting to die
  • Looking for means to kill themselves
If someone you know exhibits any of these signs, please get them help:
  • Ask them how they are really doing: "I'm concerned about you, how are you feeling?"
  • If you are concerned that someone may be considering suicide, ask the suicide question: “I’m worried about you, are you thinking about killing yourself?”
  • Get someone involved, tell your Proctor, Area Coordinator, or bring the student to the Wellness Center for walk-in crisis hours. 
If you are concerned about suicide and don’t know what to do, call the Emergency After-Hours Crisis Line 931-598-1700 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). They have trained counselors available 24/7 to speak with either you or your loved one.
 
Blogspot Header Aug 18

September Spotlight: How do you Flourish?

Nicole Noffsinger-Frazier, Ph.D, Executive Director, University Wellness Center

Wellness is a popular topic right now, you hear it everywhere, in the news, on podcasts and blogs, but what does it really mean to be well? We probably all define wellness differently, and try to achieve wellness in a variety of ways. For some, wellness may be about regular exercise and balanced nutrition, while for others being well might entail a daily meditation practice and long walks in the woods. For me, wellness is synonymous with flourishing, a construct developed by Dr. Corey Keyes at Emory University. Dr. Keyes was interested in defining (mental) health differently, not simply as the absence of pathology (disease), but as the presence of very specific components (ingredients) that foster well-being. Someone who is flourishing regularly experiences emotional well-being, social connection and belongingness, and purpose and meaning in life. Essentially, when we are flourishing we feel good, we have supportive relationships, and we have a valued direction for our life. While it is unrealistic to experience a state of flourishing every single day, it is something that we can intentionally strive to experience more days than not.

In my own life, I have discovered that there are specific daily practices and habits that promote flourishing, and when I am intentional about integrating these into my daily routine I am much more balanced and content than I would be otherwise. First, I move my body every single day, often by running or swimming, but sometimes by walking, hiking, or biking. I practice gratitude daily, by reflecting silently on things that are going well, and by stating out loud, often around the dinner table with my family, the amazing gifts we have received. Often, in my gratitude practice, I find myself reflecting on two important things: my family and my work. I am fortunate to have both a loving and supportive family and, as a psychologist, and member of the Wellness Center, a professional role that brings me joy and a clear sense of meaning and purpose in my life. Finally, savoring “mundane” daily routines is one of my regular mindfulness practices, sipping a steaming mug of coffee on my porch as the sun rises knowing that my kids are still sleeping soundly and peacefully for a few minutes before the glorious chaos of the day ensues. While these brief examples may seem simple, they all entail critical ingredients for my own flourishing: connection, movement, meaning, gratitude, and reflection.

So, how do you flourish? Spend a few minutes thinking about the daily practices and habits that help you flourish or reflect on the practices that you would like to develop to enhance your own flourishing.

 

 
Woebot

September Challenge: Download the app "Woebot" 

Here is what Woebot can do:

  1. Track your mood. Each week I'll show you how your mood changes on a graph so you can see what's up
  2. Give you insight. I can find patterns that are hard for humans to see
  3. Teach you stuff. I've got lots of techniques from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that I can share with you
  4. Help you feel better. It's true, some nice people at Stanford showed I could help with that
  5. Be there 24/7. I don't actually sleep ever so I'm always delighted to hear from you
  6. Learn from you over time. So the more we chat, the better I get to know you

Share your progress on the challenge of the month by tagging #SewaneeFlourish
 

 

 Calendar & Upcoming

 9/10/18 11:00am-2:00pm: Flourishing Fair (Manigault Park)
 9/10/18 11:00am-2:00pm: Goat Yoga (Manigault Park)
 9/26/18 12:00pm-1:00pm: Wellness Colloquium Sewanee Fail (Mary Sue Cushman Room - Lunch provided)
 9/25/18 - 9/26/18: Peer Health Educator Training

 Fall 2018 Yoga in the Annex Schedule (Starting 9/13)
 Thursday4:00pm-5:00pm (Yin Yoga)
 Friday8:00am-9:00am (Vinyasa Yoga)
 Email ssjackso@sewanee.edu if interested


 Fall 2018 Group Therapy Schedule

  • Monday 3:00pm: Mindfulness (open to all first year students)
  • Tuesday 3:00pm: Interpersonal Therapy Group I
  • Wednesday 9:00am: Mindfulness (open to all students)
  • Thursday 9:00am: Interpersonal Therapy Group II
 Email caps@sewanee.edu if interested.  All group therapy sessions are held in the University Wellness Center Annex and facilitated by John Jackson, Ben Craft and/or Katie Van Cleave. 
 
 
SAMHSA Header

SAMHSA Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant

Julian Wright, Grant & Research Administrator.

In October of 2017, the University Wellness Center received a three year Garrett Lee Smith Grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for the Sewanee Flourish Project. The purpose of Sewanee Flourish is to develop a sustainable campus infrastructure to promote suicide prevention and improve student mental health and flourishing at the University of the South.

To kick off year two of the grant, we will be hosing a Flourishing Fair on World Suicide Prevention Day (Monday, September 10, 2018) in Manigault Park from 11:00am to 2:00pm. 

What is it? The Flourishing Fair is an annual event that brings together students, campus partners, and local community organizations to promote mental health and student well-being. It aims to decrease stigma around mental health, provide tools and tips for improving mental, physical, and spiritual health, introduce health resources on and near campus, and empower students to be proactive and confident about their health and others. 

What can students, faculty, and staff do at the Flourishing Fair?
  • Goat yoga!
  • Get a massage
  • Guided meditation and yoga exercises
  • Free tulsi basil tea samples
  • Purchase Stirling's NEW grain bowl
  • Get screened & tested
  • Get involved with on campus clubs and organizations 
  • Learn about and talk with campus and community health resources
  • Find out myths and facts about mental health
  • Learn about and practice happiness-enhancing and stress-reducing exercises
  • Take pictures and tag #SewaneeFlourish
 
UHS Header

Health Services

Karen Tharp, Director, University Health Service 

Greetings from the University Health Service!  
  • Take care of yourself and our community by getting your flu vaccine! Influenza vaccines will be available through UHS beginning in October while our supply lasts.  You may walk in for a flu shot anytime during office hours (8-4:30) or make an appointment.  We will send out campus wide emails and messages from our FB page when the vaccines are available https://www.facebook.com/sewaneeuniversityhealthservice/.  
  • Sewanee is a small community in which flu spreads rapidly.  For more information about preventing influenza infection click here: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/prevention.htm
  • UHS partners with Chattanooga Cares each semester to bring free HIV testing to campus (usually at the Social Lodge near Stirling’s) a few times each semester so be on the lookout for postings from us about when they will be on campus.
  • UHS also partners with A Step Ahead, providing free contraception in the form of Nexplanon and IUDs.  For more information call UHS at 598-1270 for an appointment.

Take care of yourself and your community by getting your flu vaccine!
 

CAPS Header

Counseling and Psychological Services & Student Accessibility Services

John L. Jackson, Ph.D., Director, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

Greetings, and a warm welcome back from your friends and therapists at CAPS!
  
The bottom line on the new academic year is that CAPS has new offerings and approaches to individual therapy and group therapy.  We are welcoming our new and excellent psychiatrist, Dr. Richard Fisher, who will begin seeing patients in mid-September.  So, if you’re looking for personal growth in any number of capacities, you have at your fingertips a select staff of some very talented treatment providers.  We are open for business, and we look forward to seeing you.

For this first newsletter, I’ll simply leave you with a few good habits to develop and enhance as you enter the new year.  Here, we have the 5 Niyamas, or the duties to oneself from the ancient Indian Yoga Sutras: 1) Cleanliness – not just physical, think about cleansing yourself of habits that no longer serve you. 2) Contentment – accept and appreciate; beware and be careful of those “ifs,” “whens,” and “if onlys.”  3) Discipline- also translates to “burning enthusiasm.” So, there’s the repetition factor and the passionate drive to be developed and fed. 4) Self-Study – practice self-reflection, observation, and curiosity. 5) Surrendering to a Higher Power – perhaps you view this as to a God or spiritual stance, but remember that a simpler and more pertinent definition may entail letting go of expectations.  So, go forward and work some Niyamas. I can guarantee you that not one of the 5 “duties” will come easy, but in the words of humanist and psychologist Erich Fromm, "Nothing in life is achieved without effort, daring to take risks, and often some suffering.”

Mindfulness Header

Wellness & Outreach

Sabeth Jackson, Wellness Coordinator

The University Wellness Center is excited to welcome students back to campus and to engage the community in a variety of programs throughout the semester. Our Wellness and Outreach programs are designed to provide students with tools to help them flourish! Here’s a look at what we have planned for September!

Yoga (Weekly Beginning Sept. 13th)

  • Yin Yoga, Thursdays, 4-5 pm, UWC Annex
  • Vinyasa Yoga, Fridays, 8-9 am, UWC Annex
Family Dinner
Family Dinner is a new program we are offering in collaboration with Caroline Thompson, Senior Chef of Dining Services. We will have a different theme/Greek house host each month, and approximately 12-15 students can sign up to participate. We will provide the tools, ingredients, and techniques for the group to make a simple meal together, and then we will enjoy the fruits of our labor! (tentatively scheduled monthly on the second Friday)

Wellness Colloquium
Sewanee Fail: A Student Panel Discussion of Grit and Resilience, September 26, 12-1 pm, Mary Sue Cushman room at the WICK, Lunch provided. This series offers several open lectures throughout the year on a variety of topics. One of our themes this year is self-compassion.

Peer Health Education
The Peer Health Education program (PHE) is open to all Sewanee students and requires a 2 semester commitment. PHE's receive training that empowers them to serve their peers on a variety of health related issues. PHE’s design and deliver educational programming, and partner with groups on campus to tailor programs to their needs. Training offered in the Fall (September 25 & 265-9 pm) and Spring. Contact ssjackso@sewanee.edu to apply.

Happiness Hygiene Workshop
Happiness Hygiene is a series of workshops designed to develop practices and habits that lead to flourishing, resilience, and a life well-lived. Using information-based and experiential sessions, participants will better understand how to create daily practices to improve well-being and happiness through reflection, discussion, and participation. Topics relate to the science of happiness and focus on understanding how to optimize orientations to both the self and others. (Date/Time TBD).

 

 
 
Training Opportunities
Please see the Calendar and Updates for upcoming training dates.

Bystander Intervention Training
This prevention program emphasizes a bystander intervention approach and assumes that everyone has a role to play in ending violence against women. In addition to the prevention goal, the program has a research component which seeks to measure the effectiveness of the prevention program with different constituencies. Participation in this program and research project represents a unique opportunity to take on a leadership role in educating themselves on how to stop violence on campus. 

RESPOND Training
Respond stands for 1) Recognize signs & symptoms 2) Empathize 3) Share observations 4) Pose open questions 5) Offer hope 6) Navigate resources & policies 7) Do self-care. RESPOND is an eight-hour program designed to train higher education professionals as gatekeepers to identify symptoms of mental illness and to offer effective support to students in distress.

QPR Training
QPR stands for Question, Persuade, Refer. QPR is a two-hour evidence-based practice model for training gatekeepers and the general public on how to prevent suicide. QPR is an approach to confronting someone about their possible thoughts of suicide. It is not intended to be a form of counseling or treatment, instead a means to offer hope through positive action. 

Full Embodiment: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED)
Fully Embodied: An Empowering Dialogue (FEED) is a peer-facilitated experiential workshop designed to help participants explore their relationship to their body with the goals of understanding the effects of (1) gender socialization (2) objectification and self-objectification and (3) cultural forces rooted in patriarchy that influence how one views and experiences one’s body. By gaining knowledge of social and cultural pressures, and the mechanisms by which they retain power, participants are taught new ways of being in relationship with their bodies. Participants complete the program committed to working toward instrumentality and embodiment, experiencing a new engagement with their physical self that recognizes the power of the body to provide meaning and agency in one’s life. Practical skill development includes learning mindfulness, self-compassion, and cognitive reframing skills. 

The program was developed by Dr. Noffsinger-Frazier and is implemented annually with the assistance of two FEED co-leaders. This year's leaders are Ashlin Ondrusek and Loring McDonald.
 
 

 Resources

 The University Wellness Center
 Offers appointments Monday-Friday8:00am - 12:00pm and 1:00 - 4:30pm. Walk-in crisis services are available during this time.

 Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) caps@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1325
  • Assessment and evaluation
  • Short-term group therapy
  • Short-term individual therapy
  • Psychiatric services (medication management)
  • Crisis services
  • Community referral coordination
 Student Accessibility Services (SAS) sas@sewaneee.edu or 931-598-1325
  • Ensure all university programs and services are accessible to students with disabilities
  • Ensure that the university is in compliance with disability law
  • Grant accommodation requests for students with documented disabilities

 University Health Service (UHS) healthservice@sewanee.edu or 931-598-1270
  • Evaluation and treatment of illness and injuries
  • Health education and information
  • Physical exams
  • Sexual health services
  • Emergency contraception
  • Limited prescription medication dispensary
  • Immunizations
  • Diagnostic laboratory testing
  • Referral to specialty providers
 Crisis Resources
  • UWC, After-Hours Crisis Services 931-598-1700
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) 
  • Trevor Lifeline (support for LGBTQIAA youth) 1-866-488-7386
  • Crisis Text Line Text START to 741741

Reposting of the contents of the UWC September 2018 Newsletter.