Making Headlines

Stars and Scoops

SR Reaches Many Online and Around the World   printer  

While we are happy to say that the Sewanee Review remains and will remain a journal on printed paper, we are also a proud supporter of Project MUSE, a program instituted by the Johns Hopkins University Press that gives electronic and online access (by subscription only) to its 200 printed journals and quarterlies.  Through this system interested readers, not only in America but around the world, have immediate and full-text access to the Sewanee Review. Though Project Muse offers only recent issues (beginning with 2007), it is important to note that on JSTOR readers will find the entire run beginning in 1892 through 2006 of this longest running, continuously published literary quarterly in America.

This year, over 7,000 articles from the Sewanee Review have been viewed in their full-text forms online! The issues of the SR most frequently downloaded on Project Muse and read in full are as follows:

Fall 2008: “Jane Austen and the House of Fiction”
Summer 2011: "The Human Scene and the House of Fiction"
Winter 2011: "Idioms of Poetry
"

Spring 2011: "Literary Lives"
Winter 2012: "Stitching and Unstitching Poetry"


The pieces which were read the most this year are almost all essays on literary topics, reinforcing our belief that the Republic of Letters is still going strong around the world. Essays on Robert Frost always rank high, and among the top ten articles this year are three pieces on Frost: Scott Donaldson's excellent "Frost, Robinson, and the Judgment of Posterity," Baron Wormser's "Robert Frost and the Drama of Encounter," and Mark Royden Winchell's "The Southernness of Robert Frost." Eugene Goodheart’s “Emma: Jane Austen’s Errant Heroine" is the most popular piece for the second year in a row! Two of the other top ten essays cover literary periods as a whole—Jeffrey Hart discusses Modernism in "The Unlived Life," and Christopher Clausen writes on Romanticism in "From the Mountain to the Monsters."

Those who think of the SR as lingering in a dense Fugitive fog may be surprised to see the list of countries in which the Sewanee Review is frequently read (and downloaded) via Project MUSE: apart from the British Commonwealth, the SR is most often read in India, Germany, the Netherlands, China, Israel, Belgium, Turkey, Taiwan, Brazil, France, Croatia, Sweden, Switzerland, South Korea, Denmark, Egypt, Hungary, and Pakistan! In total, the quarterly has been read in over 70 countries!

Hundreds of articles from the SR are used for research purposes around the country and the world. In fact during this year alone, students and faculty from a staggering 996 institutions of higher learning read from the SR archives online, all the way from Boston University to the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel!