Forestry Courses:

121. Introduction to Forestry
This introduction to the science and study of forestry includes tree structure and function, forest types of North America, forest biology and ecology, silviculture, forest management, forest products, wood properties, and U.S. forest policy. Lecture, three hours, laboratory and weekend field trips. (Credit, full course.) Staff (Kuers, Smith, Torreano).
201. Natural Resource Issues and Policies
An overview of the contemporary use of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources; physical, economic, social, and environmental factors, policies and legislation affecting their use. (Credit, full course.) Smith.
204. Forest Wildlife Management
A survey and analysis of how vertebrate animals affect forest processes, with particular emphasis on forest regeneration on the Cumberland Plateau. This discussion-oriented class will also address the history and current status of U.S. and international wildlife management, and the effects of forest management on game and non-game species. Students will interact with wildlife management professionals in Tennessee and will design and implement a field study to quantify the effects of vertebrate animals on forest growth and development. Fall of even-numbered years. (Credit, full course.). Ken Smith.
211. Dendrology
Explores the biology and morphology of trees, with emphasis on the major forest species of North America and selected forest types elsewhere in the world. Primary focus is on the ecophysiological characteristics of species and their roles in forest succession, distribution across the landscape, and response to disturbance and environmental stress. Includes field identification of native trees and shrubs of the Southeast. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and weekend field trips. (Credit, full course.) Kuers.
212. Forestry in the Developing World
An introduction to the use and management of trees in the developing world. Social and technical aspects of forestry will be considered. Topics will include the role of forestry in development, land and tree tenure, the role of women in forestry projects, agroforestry, trees in traditional systems, the forest as habitat, and the role of western technology as applied to forestry in the developing world. (Credit, full course.) Smith.
230. Urban Forest Management
Study of establishing and maintaining trees in urban environments. Emphasis on the theory and practice of individual tree care, selection, pruning and assessment, as well as urban forest inventory and planning. Prerequisites: Forestry 121, or Biology 106, or permission of instructor. Lecture and field trips. Spring 1996 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Kuers.
240. Special Topics
A seminar on a topic related to forestry and natural resources. May be taken more than once for credit. (Credit, half course.) Staff.
303. Soils
A study of soils as they relate to land use, bedrock and geomorphology, site quality, and vegetation processes. Emphasizes field interpretation of soils as one component of terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisites: Chemistry 100 or 101, or permission of the instructor. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, full course. (Credit, full course.) Torreano.
305. Forest Ecology
Explores the interrelationships between structure and function of forested ecosystems, approaching the forest community from a physiological perspective. Emphasizes the influence of microclimate, nutrient cycling, and disturbance on community productivity and composition. Prerequisites: Forestry 111 or 121, and Biology 106 or 305, or permission of the instructor. Spring 1996 and alternate years. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips. (Credit, full course.) Kuers.
307. Biometrics
Presents principles and methods employed in estimating forest and other natural resource parameters. Introduction to the uses of statistical models in drawing inferences about biological populations with an emphasis on sampling theory and field methods. Topics include: significance testing, regression, correlation and analysis of variance with multiple classification. Elements of experimental design with an emphasis on biological applications. Prerequisites: either Mathematics 204 and Forestry 121 or by permission. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. (Credit, full course; lab.) Torreano.
312. Silviculture
Theories and techniques of applying ecological knowledge to control the establishment, composition, and growth of forests. Prerequisite: Forestry 111 and 121 or permission of the instructor. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips. (Credit, full course.) Kuers, Torreano.
314. Hydrology
Occurrence, movement, quality and behavior of water in the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface and underground water. Includes techniques and problems of measurement and utilization. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lectures, three hours; laboratory and field trips, three hours. (Credit, full course.) M. Knoll.
316. Tropical and Boreal Forest Ecosystems
A detailed examination of important components and processes in tropical and boreal forest ecosystems. Topics will include: climate, forests, and soils that characterize these two biomes, carbon and nutrient dynamics in undisturbed forests, and the effects of land use change on properties of these forested systems. Prerequisites: Forestry 121 or Biology 114 or Biology 131 (with permission from instructor). (Credit, full course). K. Smith.
319. Natural Resource Management and Decisions
A survey of the methods used in managing natural resources with emphasis on forests, wildlife, and other renewable resources. Use of modeling and decision-making software. Topics include: 1) evaluating the effects of forest stand characteristics, tax policy, risk, and interest rates on management practices; 2) choosing among policy alternatives proposed by competing groups; and 3) employing optimization procedures and economic analysis. Prerequisites: Forestry 121 or equivalent, Forestry 312 or taken concurrently, or by permission. (Credit, full course.) Torreano.
328. Geology and Forest Ecology of the Yellowstone Country
A study of the geologic framework, hydrology, and forest ecology of Yellowstone National Park of the Northern Rocky Mountain region. Focuses on the interrelationships between geology and forest ecology, and on the influence of fire. An additional half course may be earned with successful completion of a field trip to the Yellowstone area. Prerequisites: Geology 121, permission of the instructors, and one of the following: Forestry 111, Forestry 121, Biology 106 or Biology 131. Spring 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Kuers, M. Knoll.
329. Geology and Forest Ecology of the Yellowstone Country (Field Trip)
Prerequisite: Geology 328. Summer 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, half course.) Kuers, M. Knoll.
332. Junior Presentations in Forestry and Geology
Oral presentations of important topics and published data in forestry, geology, and other environmental sciences. Course goal is to train students through practice to give and analyze oral presentations appropriate for scientific or other professional research. Each student gives several presentations and formally critiques other presentations as part of the course. Prerequisites: Junior status in Forestry, Geology, or Natural Resources. (Credit, half course.) Staff.
410. GIS Applications in Forestry and Geology
An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), with emphasis on the use of GIS in data analysis and interpretation, decision-making, management, and research in the fields of forestry and geology. Prerequisite: Forestry 121, Geology 121, and at least one upper level course (200 or above) in forestry and geology. (Credit, half course.) Knoll.
432. Senior Interdisciplinary Field Project
An interdisciplinary field-based study of a selected portion of the University Domain or surrounding area. The primary focus of the study is to conduct a detailed analysis of interrelationships between the project area's geology, forest cover, hydrology, archeology, economics, history, and current use, and to use these parameters to critically evaluate the land-use issues of the area. Students produce a professional-quality written report of their analysis and also orally present their results to department faculty and seniors. Prerequisites: Senior status in Forestry, Geology, or Natural Resources. (Credit, full course.) Staff.
444A. Independent Study
An opportunity for student majors to explore a topic of interest in an independent or directed manner. (Credit, full course.) Staff.
444B. Independent Study
(Credit, half course.) Staff.

Geology Courses:

121. Physical Geology
Introduction to rocks and minerals, the composition and structure of the earth, and the dynamic processes operating within and upon the earth. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips (including an overnight trip to the Great Smoky Mountains), three hours. (Credit, full course.) Staff.
215. Geological Resources
A study of economically valuable minerals and rocks (including metals, nonmetals, industrial minerals, and hydrocarbons) in terms of their origin, tectonic settings, extraction and use. Topics include global distribution and genesis of deposits in relation to plate tectonic theory, prospecting techniques, mining methods, mining laws, economics of the mineral and petroleum industries, and environmental problems associated with exploration and development. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, (Credit, full course.) Shaver.
221. Mineralogy
A study of the occurrence, crystal structure, crystal chemistry, and origin of minerals. Laboratory work includes identifying hand specimens and using the petrographic microscope. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field work. Fall 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Shaver.
222. Historical Geology
History of the earth; physical environments, history of life, and tectonic development throughout geologic time as recorded in the rock record. Emphasis on North America. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips. Fall 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Potter.
225. Sedimentology
A study of sedimentary rocks and the processes that form them. Field and class studies stress the link between modern sedimentary environments and their ancient counterparts. Discussion of the occurrence of oil and coal. Emphasis on rocks of the Cumberland Plateau and other nearby areas. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, full course. Fall 1994 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Potter.
228. Tectonics
A study of the genesis and evolution of continents and ocean basins within the broad framework of global geologic systems with special emphasis on mountain chains, earthquakes, and the plate tectonics paradigm. Spring 1996 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Potter.
230. Paleoecology
A study of individuals, populations, and communities of plants and animals of the geologic past: their taphonomic histories, interactions with changing environments, and relationships to the sedimentary rock record. One weekend trip to the South Carolina State Museum and to the coastal plain. Prerequisite: Geology 121. (Credit, full course.)M. Knoll.
240. Island Ecology (also Biology 240 and Psychology 240)
This interdisciplinary field course combines the study of geology, oceanography, marine biology, botany, and wildlife behavior in a single coastal island ecosystem. Taken in conjunction with Biology 240 and Psychology 240. Prerequisite: completion of Biology 140 or equivalent. Offered each summer. (Credit, half course.) Potter, Keith-Lucas, Evans.
303. Soils
A study of soils as they relate to land use, bedrock and geomorphology, site quality, and vegetation processes. Emphasizes field interpretation of soils as one component of terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisites: Chemistry 100 or 101, or permission of the instructor. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, full course. (Credit, full course.) Torreano.
314. Hydrology
Occurrence, movement, quality and behavior of water in the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface and underground water. Includes techniques and problems of measurement and utilization. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lectures, three hours; laboratory and field trips, three hours. (Credit, full course.) M. Knoll.
320. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
Systematic study of the genesis, occurrence, composition and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Topics to include origin and crystallization of different magma types, metamorphic processes, and concepts of metamorphic belts and metamorphic facies. Laboratory work includes hand specimen and microscopic examination of igneous and metamorphic rock suites. Prerequisite: Geology 221. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, full course. Spring 1996 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Shaver.
322. Geology of the Western United States
The course focuses on several of the geologic provinces west of the Mississippi River. Extensive use of geologic maps and periodicals. An additional half course may be earned with successful completion of a field trip to the western United States. Prerequisite: Geology 121 and permission of the instructor. Spring 1996 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Potter.
323. Geology of the Western United States (Field Trip)
A detailed journal is kept by students. Summer 1996 and alternate years. (Credit, half course.) Potter.
325. Field and Structural Geology
A study of deformed rocks and an introduction to tectonics. Preparation and interpretation of geologic maps; solution of basic structural problems. Field work emphasizes geologic mapping on the Cumberland Plateau and in more structurally deformed areas in eastern Tennessee. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field work. (Credit, full course.) Potter.
328. Geology and Forest Ecology of the Yellowstone Country
A study of the geologic framework, hydrology, and forest ecology of Yellowstone National Park of the Northern Rocky Mountain region. Focuses on the interrelationships between geology and forest ecology, and on the influence of fire. An additional half course may be earned with successful completion of a field trip to the Yellowstone area. Prerequisite: Geology 121, permission of the instructors, and one of the following: Forestry 111, Forestry 121, Biology 106 or Biology 131. Spring 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, full course.) Kuers, M. Knoll.
329. Geology and Forest Ecology of the Yellowstone Country (Field Trip)
Prerequisite: Geology 328. Summer 1995 and alternate years. (Credit, half course.) Kuers, M. Knoll.
330. Invertebrate Paleontology
Identification, classification, and history of the major invertebrate phyla. Special emphasis on the use of fossil marine invertebrates and trace fossils as stratigraphic and sedimentologic tools. Prerequisite: Geology 121. Lecture, three hours; laboratory and field trips, three hours. (Credit, full course.) M. Knoll.
332. Junior Presentations in Forestry and Geology
Oral presentations of important topics and published data in forestry, geology, and other environmental sciences. Course goal is to train students through practice to give and analyze oral presentations appropriate for scientific or other professional research. Each student gives several presentations and formally critiques other presentations as part of the course. Prerequisites: Junior status in Forestry, Geology, or Natural Resources. (Credit, half course.) Staff.
410. GIS Applications in Forestry and Geology
An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), with emphasis on the use of GIS in data analysis and interpretation, decision-making, management, and research in the fields of forestry and geology. Prerequisite: Forestry 121, Geology 121, and at least one upper-level course (200 or above) in forestry and geology. (Credit, half course.) Knoll.
432. Senior Interdisciplinary Field Project
An interdisciplinary field-based study of a selected portion of the University Domain or surrounding area. The primary focus of the study is to conduct a detailed analysis of interrelationships between the project area's geology, forest cover, hydrology, archeology, economics, history, and current use, and to use these parameters to critically evaluate the land-use issues of the area. Students produce a professional-quality written report of their analysis and also orally present their results to department faculty and seniors. Prerequisites: Senior status in Forestry, Geology, or Natural Resources. (Credit, full course.) Staff.
444A. Independent Study
An opportunity for students to explore a topic of interest in an independent or directed manner. (Credit, full course.) Staff.
444B. Independent Study
(Credit, half course.) Staff.